425th Regimental Association

The regimental home of Company F (RANGER) 425th Infantry

A Memorial Day Poem

 

 

A SOLDIER DIED TODAY

He was getting old and paunchy

And his hair was falling fast,

And he sat around the Legion,

Telling stories of the past.

 

Of a war that he once fought in

And the deeds that he had done,

In his exploits with his buddies;

They were heroes, every one.

 

And ‘tho sometimes to his neighbors

His tales became a joke,

All his buddies listened quietly

For they knew where of he spoke.

 

But we’ll hear his tales no longer,

For ol’ Joe has passed away,

And the world’s a little poorer

For a Soldier died today.

 

He won’t be mourned by many,

Just his children and his wife.

For he lived an ordinary,

Very quiet sort of life.

 

He held a job and raised a family,

Going quietly on his way;

And the world won’t note his passing,

‘Tho a Soldier died today.

 

When politicians leave this earth,

Their bodies lie in state,

While thousands note their passing,

And proclaim that they were great.

 

Papers tell of their life stories

From the time that they were young

But the passing of a Soldier

Goes unnoticed, and unsung.

 

Is the greatest contribution

To the welfare of our land,

Some jerk who breaks his promise

And cons his fellow man?

 

Or the ordinary fellow

Who in times of war and strife,

Goes off to serve his country

And offers up his life?

 

The politician’s stipend

And the style in which he lives,

Are often disproportionate,

To the service that he gives.

 

While the ordinary Soldier,

Who offered up his all,

Is paid off with a medal

And perhaps a pension, small.

 

It is not the politicians

With their compromise and ploys,

Who won for us the freedom

That our country now enjoys.

 

Should you find yourself in danger,

With your enemies at hand,

Would you really want some cop-out,

With his ever waffling stand?

 

Or would you want a Soldier

His home, his country, his kin,

Just a common Soldier,

Who would fight until the end.

 

He was just a common Soldier,

And his ranks are growing thin,

But his presence should remind us

We may need his likes again.

 

For when countries are in conflict,

We find the Soldier’s part

Is to clean up all the troubles

That the politicians start.

 

If we cannot do him honor

While he’s here to hear the praise,

Then at least let’s give him homage

At the ending of his days.

 

Perhaps just a simple headline

In the paper that might say:

“OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING,

A SOLDIER DIED TODAY.”

 

 

Remember Pearl Harbor – A Day That Shall Live in Infamy

Battleship USS West Virginia sunk and burning at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. In background is the battleship USS Tennessee.

 

September 11, 2001 was our December 7, 1941. Our country was caught off guard. Let us never forget either date.

A Soldier’s Night Before Christmas

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The Soldier’s Night Before Christmas

T’was the night before Christmas, he lived all alone,
In a one bedroom house made of plaster & stone.
I had come down the chimney with presents to give
And to see just who in this home did live.

I looked all about a strange sight I did see,
No tinsel, no presents, not even a tree.
No stocking by the fire, just boots filled with sand,
On the wall hung pictures of far distant lands.

With medals and badges, awards of all kind
A sober thought came through my mind.
For this house was different, so dark and dreary,
I knew I had found the home of a soldier, once I could see clearly.

I heard stories about them, I had to see more
So I walked down the hall and pushed open the door.
And there he lay sleeping silent alone,
Curled up on the floor in his one bedroom home.

His face so gentle, his room in such disorder,
Not how I pictured a United States soldier.
Was this the hero of whom I’d just read?
Curled up in his poncho, a floor for his bed?

His head was clean shaven, his weathered face tan,
I soon understood this was more than a man.
For I realized the families that I saw that night
Owed their lives to these men who were willing to fight.

Soon ‘round the world, the children would play,
And grownups would celebrate on a bright Christmas day.
They all enjoyed freedom each month of the year,
Because of soldiers like this one lying here.

I couldn’t help wonder how many lay alone
On a cold Christmas Eve in a land far from home.
Just the very thought brought a tear to my eye,
I dropped to my knees and started to cry.

The soldier awakened and I heard a rough voice,
“Santa don’t cry, this life is my choice;
I fight for freedom, I don’t ask for more,
my life is my God, my country, my Corps.”

With that he rolled over and drifted off into sleep,
I couldn’t control it, I continued to weep.
I watched him for hours, so silent and still,
I noticed he shivered from the cold night’s chill.

So I took off my jacket, the one made of red,
And I covered this Soldier from his toes to his head.
And I put on his T-shirt of gray and black,
With an eagle and an Army patch embroidered on back.

And although it barely fit me, I began to swell with pride,
And for a shining moment, I was United States Army deep inside.
I didn’t want to leave him on that cold dark night,
This guardian of honor so willing to fight.

Then the soldier rolled over, whispered with a voice so clean and pure,
“Carry on Santa, it’s Christmas Day, all is secure.”
One look at my watch, and I knew he was right,
Merry Christmas my friend, and to all a good night!

425th Regimental Reunion Dinner

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425 Crest425th Regimental Reunion Dinner

Friday, October 23, 2015

Bruce VFW Post

28404 Jefferson Ave., St. Clair Shores, MI

You are cordially invited to attend the 2015 Regimental Reunion Dinner. This is a great opportunity to renew past friendships and make some new ones.

The Reunion Dinner will include dinner, open bar, and a memorable speaker. There will also be unit and association t-shirts, hats, coins, and other memorabilia on sale.

1800    Bar opens

1900    Dinner

2000    Announcements, toasts, and speaker

2200    Formal activities are concluded. Members are invited to stay longer and socialize in the Post Club Room.

Our guest speaker will be SSG (ret) Quentin Waite. SSG Waite is one of the original members of Merrill’s Marauders, and one of the few remaining members of the Marauders. Although he is 94 years old, he is a dynamic speaker who is still active in the U.S. Army Ranger Association and the Chaplain of the Michigan Ranger Base. You have never heard a speaker with his experiences – experiences that are extremely relevant to veterans of Company F.

The cost of this event is $30 per person. Payment must be made in advance NLT October 9, 2015.

For credit card payments click on this link – http://425regiment.org/?page_id=1363, or copy and paste it into your preferred web browser.

Payment made be made by check (payable to 425th Regimental Association) and sending the form at the bottom of this invitation to Dean Burchill, 22533 Lincoln, St. Clair Shores, MI 48082

There is no designated attire for this event. Members are encouraged to wear the Army Service Uniform, Class A Army Green Uniform, business suit, or sport coat and tie.

 

425th Regimental Reunion Dinner Registration

October 23, 2015

Registration Form

Name ___________________________________________________________

Address _________________________________________________________

Highest rank held _________________ Number of guests _________________

Email address _____________________________________________________

Phone Numbers:   Home (______) __________ Cell (_______) __________

Amount Paid $ ______________

Send this form (with check) to:

Dean Burchill

22533 Lincoln

St. Clair Shores, MI 48082

A Soldier’s Christmas

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Airborne ChristmasThe embers glowed softly, and in their dim light,
I gazed round the room and I cherished the sight.
My wife was asleep, her head on my chest,
my daughter beside me, angelic in rest.

Outside the snow fell, a blanket of white,
Transforming the yard to a winter delight.
The sparkling lights in the tree, I believe,
Completed the magic that was Christmas Eve.

My eyelids were heavy, my breathing was deep,
Secure and surrounded by love I would sleep
in perfect contentment, or so it would seem.
So I slumbered,  perhaps I started to dream.

The sound wasn’t loud, and it wasn’t too near,
But I opened my eye when it tickled my ear.
Perhaps just a cough, I didn’t quite know,
Then the sure sound of footsteps outside in the snow.

My soul gave a tremble, I struggled to hear,
and I crept to the door just to see who was near.
Standing out in the cold and the dark of the night,
A lone figure stood, his face weary and tight.

A soldier, I puzzled, some twenty years old
Perhaps a Marine, huddled here in the cold.
Alone in the dark, he looked up and smiled,
Standing watch over me, and my wife and my child.

“What are you doing?” I asked without fear
“Come in this moment, it’s freezing out here!
Put down your pack, brush the snow from your sleeve,
You should be at home on a cold Christmas Eve!”

For barely a moment I saw his eyes shift,
away from the cold and the snow blown in drifts,
to the window that danced with a warm fire’s light
then he sighed and he said “Its really all right,
I’m out here by choice. I’m here every night”

“Its my duty to stand at the front of the line,
that separates you from the darkest of times.
No one had to ask or beg or implore me,
I’m proud to stand here like my fathers before me.

My Gramps died at ‘Pearl on a day in December,”
then he sighed, “That’s a Christmas ‘Gram always remembers.”
My dad stood his watch in the jungles of ‘Nam
And now it is my turn and so, here I am.

I’ve not seen my own son in more than a while,
But my wife sends me pictures, he’s sure got her smile.
Then he bent and he carefully pulled from his bag,
The red white and blue… an American flag.

“I can live through the cold and the being alone,
Away from my family, my house and my home,
I can stand at my post through the rain and the sleet,
I can sleep in a foxhole with little to eat,
I can carry the weight of killing another
or lay down my life with my sisters and brothers
who stand at the front against any and all,
to insure for all time that this flag will not fall.”

“So go back inside,” he said, “harbor no fright
Your family is waiting and I’ll be all right.”
“But isn’t there something I can do, at the least,
“Give you money,” I asked, “or prepare you a feast?
It seems all too little for all that you’ve done,
For being away from your wife and your son.”

Then his eye welled a tear that held no regret,
“Just tell us you love us, and never forget
To fight for our rights back at home while we’re gone.
To stand your own watch, no matter how long.

For when we come home, either standing or dead,
to know you remember we fought and we bled
is payment enough, and with that we will trust.
That we mattered to you as you mattered to us.

Michael Marks
December 7th, 2000

425th Regimental Association Newsletter – Summer 2014

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Dining In LOGO425th Regimental Association

E-Newsletter

Summer, 2014

 

NOTE: If you are using an Army Knowledge Online email address or an email address from your employer, we recommend that you use a personal email account. This is so we can stay in contact with you regardless of your employment or military status.

425th Regimental Association 2014 Dining Out

The first Dining Out since the inactivation of the unit was held at the Bruce VFW Post on April 12th. It was well attended with 109 members and family present.

The evening started with time to reacquaint with old friends and comrades. Some had not seen each other in years and many of the most recent members of Co F were able to meet some of the original members of the unit. As the stories (jump lies) were told with the altitudes higher, winds stronger, and nights darker, the revelry was interrupted as everyone was asked to take their seats for dinner.

The formal portion of the evening was initiated with the Pledge of Allegiance and the Airborne Prayer.

The Roll Call of Absent Friends was followed by a moment of silence.

Regimental CSM Dean Burchill discussed the Memorial Monument at Camp Grayling and

President Dick Anderson recognized former First Sergeants and Commanders in attendance and introduced the guest speaker, former Co F First Sergeant and now CSM Bryan Merkel of the 1st Bn, 125 Infantry.

CSM Merkel recalled his time with Company F, his two deployments with the unit. When comparing his time on active duty prior to joining Company F and his time in other units since leaving the unit, he said his time with Company F was the best.

The key point of his presentation was that soldiers from Company F have been assigned to many other units and they are making a difference and adding value in every case. They are setting a new standard for excellence that is increasing unit performance.

Following CSM Merkel’s presentation dinner was served. It was generally agreed that the food was delicious and there was plenty of it.

The social gathering continued after dinner and many members hung around to adjourn to the post’s club room to continue the celebration.

We want to give special thank you to the team that coordinated this event:

Thunder Over Michigan

Once again David Lincicome will be leading the charge for our parking project at the Willow Run Airport.   It will be the weekend of 9 & 10 August.  As in the past the Association will receive funds for our coffers in accordance to the number of volunteers we have working the parking concession. We have done well  the past several years. Let’s make this another banner year.  You can work both days or just one and get  to see the air show free.  Workers will receive their choice of a  free logo hat / T-shirt or license plate.   For more details or to volunteer contact David Lincicome.

Joint 82nd Airborne Division Association/425th Regimental Association Picnic

Saturday. 26 July 2014 / Family Picnic starts at 1100 hrs

Bruce VFW Post /  28404 E. Jefferson Ave,   St. Clair Shores, MI.   (Located between 11 & 12 mile Roads)

As in the past, the 82nd Association will be supplying hot dogs, hamburgers, (Burned to order) condiments, paper plates, utensils, and beer.  (please put a generous donation in the can to cover these and other costs)

Dinner is pot luck and those attending are encouraged to bring a dish to pass. The grill opens around noon.

There will be games for the kids, so you are also encouraged to bring a prize to donate (possibly something from the dollar store) for kids up to age 12.

At present there will be a skydive demo jump between 1300 and 1400 hours.  The 82nd will be running a closest to the pin raffle where for $5 you can buy a measurement (in increments of two inches).  (Time subject to change). If you pick the closest skydiver to the target you will win  50% of the money taken in.  The skydivers volunteer their jump to help the 82nd Association but the Jump A/C and fuel are not free so this pays for their expenses.  Make as many guesses at 5 bucks per as you wish.

Military Star Card

Consider applying for the Military Star Card and get a 10% discount at Exchange food courts and $.05 discount at the Exchange gas station. (NOTE: The discounts only apply at Army and Air Force Exchanges.)   http://www.shopmyexchange.com/exchangecredit/

425 Regimental Association Board Of Directors, Contact Information 

President:                    Richard Anderson – president@425regiment.org

Vice President            Mark Evans – vicepresident@425regiment.org

Secretary:                    Tony Lopiccolo – secretary@425regiment.org

Treasurer:                   Tom Neff  – treasurer@425regiment.org

Historian:                    Don Bugg – historian@425regiment.org

 RCSM:                         Dean Burchill – csm@425regiment.org

Adjutant :                    Bob Wangen – adjutant@425regiment.org

Quartermaster:        David Lincicome – quartermaster@425regiment.org

The Path of a Warrior – Memorial Day 2014

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Memorial Day was officially proclaimed on 5 May 1868 by General John Logan, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, in his General Order No. 11, and was first observed on 30 May 1868, as Decoration Day, when flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery. The first state to officially recognize the holiday was New York in 1873. By 1890 it was recognized by all of the northern states. The South refused to acknowledge the day, honoring their dead on separate days until after World War I (when the holiday changed from honoring just those who died fighting in the Civil War to honoring Americans who died fighting in any war). It is now celebrated in almost every State on the last Monday in May (passed by Congress with the National Holiday Act of 1971 (P.L. 90 – 363) to ensure a three day weekend for Federal holidays).

Traditional observance of Memorial day has diminished over the years. Many Americans nowadays have forgotten the meaning and traditions of Memorial Day. At many cemeteries, the graves of the fallen are increasingly ignored, neglected. Most people no longer remember the proper flag etiquette for the day. While there are towns and cities that still hold Memorial Day parades, many have not held a parade in decades. Some people think the day is for honoring any and all dead, and not just those fallen in service to our country.

To help re-educate and remind Americans of the true meaning of Memorial Day, the “National Moment of Remembrance” resolution was passed on Dec 2000 which asks that at 3 p.m. local time, for all Americans “To voluntarily and informally observe in their own way a Moment of remembrance and respect, pausing from whatever they are doing for a moment of silence or listening to ‘Taps.”

This video may help you remember those whom in Lincoln’s words, gave their “last full measure of devotion” to this country and the ideals it represents.

All gave some, some gave all!

425th Regimental Association 2014 Dining Out

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Dining In LOGOThe first Dining Out since the inactivation of the unit was held at the Bruce VFW Post on April 12th. It was well attended with over 100 members and family present.

2014 Dining Out - 10The evening started with time to reacquaint with old friends and comrades. Some had not seen each other in years and many of the most recent members of Co F were able to meet some of the original members of the unit. As the stories (jump lies) were told with the altitudes higher, winds stronger, and nights darker, the revelry was interrupted as everyone was asked to take their seats for dinner.

The formal portion of the evening was initiated with the Pledge of Allegiance and the Airborne Prayer.Flag at halfstaff

The Roll Call of Absent Friends was followed by a moment of silence.

Regimental CSM Dean Burchill discussed the Memorial Monument at Camp Grayling and

President Dick Anderson recognized former First Sergeants and Commanders in attendance and introduced the guest speaker, former Co F First Sergeant and now CSM Bryan Merkel of the 1st Bn, 125 Infantry.

CSM Merkel recalled his time with Company F, his two deployments with the unit. When comparing his time on active duty prior to joining Company F and his time in other units since leaving the unit, he said his time with Company F was the best.

2014 Dining Out - 1The key point of his presentation was that soldiers from Company F have been assigned to many other units and they are making a difference and adding value in every case. They are setting a new standard for excellence that is increasing unit performance.2014 Dining Out - 7

Following CSM Merkel’s presentation dinner was served. It was generally agreed that the food was delicious and there was plenty of it.

The social gathering continued after dinner and many members hung around to adjourn to the post’s club room to continue the celebration.

2014 Dining Out - 4We want to give a special thank you to the team that coordinated this event:

425th Regimental Association Dining Out – April 12, 2014

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Dining In LOGOThe 425th Regimental Association plans to hold a dining out April 12 2014, In order to do this we need to gauge the participation level, “HEAD COUNT” The cost per individual will be announced once a estimated attendance level is established. The cost of admission once calculated will be for the following, Hall, Open Bar, Food, and Shuttle service to the local Holiday Inn Express.

The event will take place at the VFW 1146 Bruce Post, 28404 Jefferson Ave., St. Clair Shores, Michigan. With the date placed well in advance we hope to have a huge turn out.To let the Dining Out team know you are interested in attending go to the Facebook event at https://www.facebook.com/events/243918029098493/?ref=23.  If you are not on Facebook, let us know if you are interested in attending by making a comment on this post.  Let us know if you will attend and how many guests you might bring.

We also encourage any support for this event from our members, If you have connections to have any Co.F merchandise made such as T-shirts, Mugs, Decals, Etc, please comment to this post.

Who Signed the Declaration of Independence?

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Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence ?

Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died.

Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned.
Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.

Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War.

They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor.

What kind of men were they?

Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists.
Eleven were merchants,
nine were farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated, but they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.
Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties to pay his debts, and died in rags.

Thomas McKeam was so hounded by the British that he was forced to move his family almost constantly.
He served in the Congress without pay, and his family was kept in hiding. His possessions were taken from him, and poverty was his reward.

Vandals or soldiers looted the properties of Dillery, Hall, Clymer, Walton, Gwinnett, Heyward, Ruttledge, and Middleton.

At the battle of Yorktown , Thomas Nelson, Jr., noted that the British General Cornwallis had taken over the Nelson home for his headquarters. He quietly urged General George Washington to open fire. The home was destroyed, and Nelson died bankrupt.

Francis Lewis had his home and properties destroyed. The enemy jailed his wife, and she died within a few months.

John Hart was driven from his wife’s bedside as she was dying. Their 13 children fled for their lives. His fields and his gristmill were laid to waste. For more than a year he lived in forests and caves, returning home to find his wife dead and his children vanished.
So, take a few minutes while enjoying your 4th of July holiday and silently thank these patriots. It’s not much to ask for the price they paid.

Remember: freedom is never free!

I hope you will show your support by sending this to as many people as you can, please. It’s time we get the word out that patriotism
is NOT a sin, and the Fourth of July has more to it than beer, picnics, and baseball games.